Friday, November 23, 2007

PERVERT ON WHEELS

Tailgating & harrassment. LADIES BEWARE - old guy in a mini van was following me today and taking pictures of me. Once I noticed from my car, I rolled down my window and asked him to stop but he continued to harass me. I called the police and filed a report against him (unfortunately he was already gone), so if you see this pervert and he does the same to you - do not be afraid to report him. Men should not be taking random pictures of women - its wrong and you never know what these men will do with these unauthorized images. His actions today are alarming to my safety and privacy.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

But it is o.k. for you to take a picture of man who is harassing you? Would that photo not be unauthorized? Isn't that what hollaback is...taking an unauthorized photo? I guess it cuts both ways. You have no expectation of privacy in a public place. I am pretty sure this includes in your car sitting in traffic.

Don't Be Silent DC said...

"But it is o.k. for you to take a picture of man who is harassing you?"

I think it is, because once the harasser's crossed the line and violated someone's human rights, the harasser has given up theirs.

Anonymous said...

It was a rhetorical question. I know it is o.k. for you to take a picture of man who is harassing you. It is o.k. for you to take the picture of someone who isn't as well. Like I said no expectation of privacy in a public place. How else could the paparazzi do what they do?

You do have the right however to walk down a street un-accosted.

Anonymous said...

i disagree with the above anonymous. a creepy man taking pictures of women is a form of harrassment in and of itself, especially if he is following you around.

-other anonymous

Anonymous said...

You may feel that taking pictures in a public place is creepy, but it actually is not against the law. The paparazzi example is a good one. Imagine if you were not only photographed, but followed EVERYWHERE you went and ambushed by throngs of photographers tripping over themselves? If there was a way to stop this, I'm sure it would have happened by now...

Loretta said...

Its not considered harassment to photograph celebrities because they are public figures. Regular people do have the expectation of privacy in public spaces.

Anonymous said...

You may have the "expectation of privacy in public places," but you'd be wrong. Public places are just that, *public*. Ever hear of street photography? That's all about taking "unauthorized" pictures in public places. You may think this guy was up to something creepy, and maybe he was, but he has every right to take your picture in public.

Anonymous said...

Its not considered harassment to photograph celebrities because they are public figures. Regular people do have the expectation of privacy in public spaces.

=======

Then how do you explain the CCTV cameras used by some police departments and businesses to watch the streets?

Anonymous said...

I think that there is a difference between taking pictures of public places where people indirectly happen to be, taking pictures of celebrities, and taking pictures of people directly who do not appreciate being photographed.

Granted alot of that has to do with intent, which is hard to prove or define. And just because the law doesn't say its wrong doesnt mean its right either. Laws change and grow to the demands of society. Maybe there isn't a law for this yet because it hasn't been needed until now due to the advancement of technology.

There has also been alot of talk about whether its right to photograph celebrities in that way as well. I, personally, don't feel that one's job should warrent this to be allowed. Then again, I wouldn't take such a job knowing that behavior might happen to me.

Driving in my car to me, does not warrent such behavior. I should be able to drive to work and home, to the grocery store, to a friends house, without having random people take my photograph.

I also know that many artistic street photographers will ask prior or after taking a picture of a stranger whether it is ok to take a photo, or ok to use the photo.

These catcallers and perverts have already broken boundries. Photographing them is our way of A) fighting back B) protecting others.

Anonymous said...

Who's harassing who is up to a court to decide. Anyone can sound like or paint a picture of themselves as the victim of harassment. In reading this blog, everyone sounds like they have a valid point but the real point is- who do you want deciding what harassment is? Public opinion! I think NOT.
You say you were harassed and he could say its a public place and he's free to take your picture. Or, he could turn around and say you did something and you in fact were harassing him, then your story wouldn't account for anything other than the fact you have a picture that shows everyone you might have been harassing him.
Next your gonna say you are part of a group of people who go around taking pictures of people whom you THINK are perverts. This slippery slope will make it so nobody believes anybody. I know I DONT.